• Erin Fedeson

Waggish Writer Geeks Out: The Bookshelf: Part 6

Updated: Oct 26, 2020

Hello and welcome to Waggish Writer. This is Part 6 of "Waggish Writer Geeks Out: The Bookshelf."


Below is the background of my website that is a sample of my library.


Last time I embraced my geek-ness, I went over Robert's "The Bride Quartet" and Flagg's "A Redbird Christmas."


Onward to the next books in the Waggish Writer's library!

Just a quick reminder, these books have meaning to me as a person, as a writer, and as both. I will list the book from left to right with APA citation and a short description of what is the book and why is it in my library.


At the end of "The Bookshelf" series, I'll create a list in case any of these books strike your fancy for practical writing tools or pure entertainment value.


Toboso, Y. (2010). Black Butler (Vol. 1). Yen Press.


Toboso, Y. (2010). Black Butler (Vol. 2). Yen Press.


Toboso, Y. (2010). Black Butler (Vol. 3). Yen Press.


Toboso, Y. (2011). Black Butler (Vol. 4). Yen Press.


Toboso, Y. (2011). Black Butler (Vol. 5). Yen Press.


The first thing you'll notice about this part of my collection is that the numbers go from V to I. I organized the books this way because the manga is styled the Japanese tradition of words being right to left. Therefore, they start their books on the right and read to the left. I organized the books this way so I would remember to grab the correct book and read it correctly. My encounter with Toboso's work actually occurred with the Black Butler anime created by A-1 Studios, one of the FanFictions that I am working on with my story, "Her Maid, Blood Bird." I later discovered there was a manga, which I decided to pick up. There is different style of drawing and the manga is taking the story a different route. I enjoy both. I envision I may do a series of blogs comparing the manga to the anime in the future.


Frederic, L. (1995). A dictionary of the martial arts. (P. Crompton, Ed. and Trans.). Charles E. Turtle Company, Inc. (Original work published 1988).


This is one of the books I picked up because of my fascination for the martial arts, stemming from my interest in the samurai by "Himura Kenshin" and "Bleach." My interest in the other martial arts developed via the anime series titled "Kenichi the Mightiest Disciple" I encountered back when Hulu had no subscriptions. It was that time that I discovered "Black Butler" and "Hellsing Ultimate." Martial arts is a wide discipline that covers weapons usage to unarmed combat. There was a time I learned Kendo and Akikdo. I was curious about the two styles since they were rooted in the Japanese culture and joined clubs to learn more. I spent roughly a year with Kendo and a semester with Akiko. I enjoyed what I learned, but I was not in the mindset or place to proceed into Bogu (armed combat for Kendo) or the more advanced Akikdo (I could never roll up from the mat when practicing the falls while the instructor could spring up like toast from a toaster). I have not gone through the dictionary completely, but it is there when I want to write or learn something about the martial arts I wanted to incorporate into my writing or kicks and giggles.


This will be a wrap for Part 6 of the Bookshelf series. Part 7 will cover a recent addition to my library for times I play DND, a book that heralds back to when I worked as a contributor/staff writer at the Washtenaw Voice, and a novel that holds a dear place in my heart due to a family friend.


Well, if you like what you've read, comment with what are three books from your library.


They can be books you consider your writer's bible(s), authors you look up to, or books you read for the full joy of reading.


If you do, tell me why. Let's geek out together.

 

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